Designs of Daily Life

This week, for our design week, we were tasked with being on the look out for design examples and snapping photos of them. These designs had to related to one of many possible design principles, many of which are explained in more detail in this article, one I found useful for this project. I thought it was overall a fun activity, especially since it made me more aware of how many designs I see on a daily basis (and it made me realize I only visit about 2 places often in my daily life, my house and the college campus, oops).

First, is this painting from my home, which I chose to represent the use of minimalism and space. This is a picture my mom and I picked out recently and when she chose it, she remarked she didn’t know why she liked it so much, since it was just some simple buildings and white space, and there were many other more detailed paintings of nature and other rich scenes. I think the draw of a simple painting like this that my mom exemplified, describes perfectly the appeal of simple designs. It draws attention to both the simplicity of the white space above and the simply drawn, but still details old houses, which balance the picture nicely and make it visually appealing and very peaceful overall. I really love this painting, and I’m happy my mom chose it for above our mantle.

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Design Principles: typography #ds106 #designblitz

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Second, this is a design that hangs on the wall of my room, a giant ‘J’ which represents my name, Jessica. This is an extreme example of typography, as the letter ‘J’ is made of weathered wood and a font that is simple, yet smooth around the edges, keeping the appeal of the weathered wood design and the peeling paint. This was a gift given to me by a friend, and I really love having it on my wall. It’s such a simple decoration, a single letter, which goes to show how powerful words and the design of one letter itself can create a great design.

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Design Principles: Function/Message #ds106 #designblitz

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This is a picture of a recycling sign at the university, which I chose to analyze with regards to Form/Function/Message because I thought it very clearly got it’s message across in a practical manner. It’s message is obviously to inform the reader about recycling, what can and cannot be recycled, and to encourage the reader to recyclable. The reader’s eyes are first drawn to the giant arrow with simple images of examples of things that can be recycled, giving the information at a quick glance, visually. Additionally, the red text signaling what cannot be recycled and the green text signifying what can be recycled give easily read information which are easily distinguished from each other by the color. Anyone looking at this poster can clearly tell it is informational and get the information they need from it without much difficulty, which is why I think it’s a good example of design function and message.

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Design Principles: Color #ds106 #designblitz

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This is the Star Wars: The Force Awakens poster that I have in my bedroom, which I chose as an example of the use of color. The dominant colors in this poster are red on the left and blue on the red, both powerful primary colors that give a balance in color to the image. These colors make the poster bold and dramatic overall, in theme with Star Wars. Also, the red is associated with evil as it comes from both Kylo Ren’s light saber and the explosions from the ship. The blue represents good, as it comes from Finn’s light saber and the Millennium falcon below it. These themes of good and evil are representative of Star Wars and make it a visually appealing and effective poster.

Finally, I just had to include this picture of my shower curtain, which I chose to represent balance. Here, the curtain contains sharks with cats sleeping on them, and bright red flowers in the background. The work represents asymmetrical balance overall since there isn’t an exact pattern to the placement of the sharks and cats, as well as flowers. These are normally things that we don’t associate with each other and yet, the fact of that in itself causes them to balance each other out, creating the odd appeal of the shower curtain, which is somehow aesthetically pleasing. This is an example of an unusual balance, in both physical placement and themes.

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